wolverine airsoft Reaper

wolverine airsoft reaper overview

Overview

wolverine airsoft reaper compatibility

Compatibility

wolverine airsoft reaper specs

Specifications

wolverine airsoft reaper videos

Videos

Instruction Manual

 

FAQ

So what’s different between this and the GEN2 Inferno?

The Reaper is best thought of as a combination of the technology from the BOLT, with the packaging and a few design pointers from the GEN2 Inferno. The Reaper is a single solenoid, closed bolt design, compared to the GEN2 Inferno’s Hybrid open/closed bolt design. The Reaper is a fixed volume system, meaning it has a reservoir which is charged before the shot and then released to fire the bb. The GEN2 design is a direct flow system where air flows directly from the line through the solenoid and will continue flowing as long as the valve is open.

So which is better?

That’s sort of like asking which is better: A sports car or a hot hatch? Both will do about 90% of what we do in a car (get to work, pick up the groceries, etc) equally well. But the experience will be a little different getting there, and they will each have their own set of advantages and disadvantages when compared. In this analogy we think of the GEN2 Inferno as the hot hatch. It’s incredibly versatile and will get virtually any job done admirably well. The Reaper has a natural advantage in areas like use as a DMR (due to it’s closed bolt design and incredibly quiet operation), or semi only applications, but is a little less flexible when it comes to some other things like higher ROF applications. Like the sports car and the pick up, most of the time the choice comes down to preference as most of us usually don’t use either vehicle to its full potential very often. Check out this video for a more detailed comparison:

But the closed bolt system on the Reaper is going to be more accurate and consistent than the Hybrid bolt design of the Gen2, right?

Maybe. While the closed bolt design is certainly the gold standard of the hop up tuner, extensive testing with both systems has brought us to the conclusion that while the closed bolt design does have a slight edge in absolute terms, the average user probably won’t notice a huge difference. In short: the hybrid system in the Gen2 is extremely refined and yields excellent results from CQB to DMR, but the BOLT technology which the Reaper inherits does slightly top it in the consistency category.

Here’s the catch: inconsistencies and faults in how either system is installed, set up, tuned, or how the hop up is configured, will VERY quickly drown out these differences. Like the BOLT, what the Reaper offers here is: by combining the closed bolt design with the consistency of the direct solenoid firing, you get the best possible performance for your hop up configuration. Also like the BOLT, it can’t fix a bad hop up, barrel, or gun.

So What do you mean by “Electro Mechanical”?

This is a configuration exactly like the BOLT. There is a simple, robust wire harness, and a battery. No FCU is needed to power the system. The wire harness is connected to the stock trigger switch in the gun being used. (no you don’t have to worry about burnt trigger contacts etc as the current draw is much lower than an AEG) This allows the gun to operate in semi auto without the cost and complexity of an FCU, and makes for a very affordable, robust system, perfect for a DMR, Semi-only CQB, or a milsim build. Because there is no FCU there is no parasitic drain on the battery so you don’t have to worry about killing your lipo if you forget to unplug it after the game, and playing in the rain or snow is a non issue because there is no FCU to be damaged.

The Air saver technology: Does that make it more efficient than the GEN2 Inferno?

The air saver increases the efficiency of the dump chamber style design between 15 and 20% depending on your configuration. However the GEN2 Inferno is such an incredibly efficient system, the numbers end up being extremely close. In our experience it depends on the set up which design is more efficient. (please note: our efficiency numbers are based on the prototypes of the Reaper: some adjustments have been made for final production which we expect will slightly improve the efficiency so this is subject to change) One advantage the Reaper does have on efficiency is that the air consumption is not affected by the tuning of the dwell. So right out of the box you will be sure to get 100% of the efficiency the system has to offer.

So do you have to set the dwell at all then?

Yes and no. Many people will find that out of the box there is no need for adjustment to the dwell at all and they are happy to keep the setting the way it is. The dwell time on the Reaper controls how long the nozzle stays in the back position, so the dwell needs to be high enough to allow a bb to load, so if the dwell is set to low, you will need to adjust it up to allow proper feeding, however this can be done without the assistance of a chronograph as it is quite obvious when the system doesn’t feed.

So when will this piece of awesomeness be available?

The first batch of the Reaper is already in production and price and availability will be announced shortly.